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All the books Isaac reads in Heartstopper

Hello bookworms!! I am addicted to the tv adaptation that is Heartstopper. In the week (and two days) since it has been out, I’ve watched it three times. While I have been on holidays with very little internet. So today I wanted to share all the books that Isaac reads in Heartstopper.

If you haven’t seen the show yet, you might be touch confused. Isaac is a brand new character, made only for the tv adaptation. Alice Oseman, creator of Heartstopper, introduced Isaac to Charlie, Tao and Elle’s friend group as a substitute for Aled Last. HOPEFULLY this means that Aled is being saved for some sort of adaptation of Radio Silence, where he is the main character with Frances.

In the show Isaac doesn’t say a great deal, but he’s ALWAYS got a book in his hands. He reads everything ― graphic novels, autobiographies, YA novels, non-fiction, sci-fi and classics!! And we stan a voracious reader. So, I wanted to celebrate Isaac by sharing all the books that he reads in the show. (Also, please appreciate that it took me SO LONG to find the matching covers for each edition. That P&P one was a nightmare to find.)

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all the books Isaac reads in Heartstopper

Dune Messiah — Frank Herbert

Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert

NOTE: This is book TWO in the Dune series. Blurb may contain spoilers.

Dune Messiah continues the story of Paul Atreides, better known ― and feared ― as the man christened Muad’Dib. As Emperor of the Known Universe, he possesses more power than a single man was ever meant to wield. Worshipped as a religious icon by the fanatical Fremens, Paul faces the enmity of the political houses he displaced when he assumed the throne ― and a conspiracy conducted within his own sphere of influence.

And even as House Atreides begins to crumble around him from the machinations of his enemies, the true threat to Paul comes to his lover, Chani, and the unborn heir to his family’s dynasty…

Naruto Vol 72 — Masashi Kishimoto

NOTE: This volume is number 72, but since it’s SO FAR into the series, the blurb below is for volume 1. Also, we stan that Isaac reads graphic novels, given what Heartstopper is adapted from. 🥰

Naruto is a ninja-in-training with an incorrigible knack for mischief. His wild antics amuse his teammates, but Naruto is completely serious about one thing: becoming the world’s greatest ninja!

Twelve years ago the Village Hidden in the Leaves was attacked by a fearsome threat. A nine-tailed fox spirit claimed the life of the village leader, the Hokage, and many others. Today, the village is at peace, and a troublemaking kid named Naruto is struggling to graduate from Ninja Academy. His goal may be to become Hokage, but his true destiny will be much more complicated.

Naruto Volume 72 by Masashi Kishimoto

Quantum Mechanics — Leonard Susskind and Art Friedman

Quantum Mechanics by Leonard Susskind and Art Friedman

From the bestselling author of The Theoretical Minimum, a DIY introduction to the math and science of quantum physics. First he taught you classical mechanics. Now, physicist Leonard Susskind has teamed up with data engineer Art Friedman to present the theory and associated mathematics of the strange world of quantum mechanics.

In this follow-up to The Theoretical Minimum, Susskind and Friedman provide a lively introduction to this famously difficult field, which attempts to understand the behavior of sub-atomic objects through mathematical abstractions. Unlike other popularizations that shy away from quantum mechanics’ weirdness, Quantum Mechanics embraces the utter strangeness of quantum logic. The authors offer crystal-clear explanations of the principles of quantum states, uncertainty and time dependence, entanglement, and particle and wave states, among other topics, and each chapter includes exercises to ensure mastery of each area.

A Good Girl’s Guide to Murder — Holly Jackson

The case is closed. Five years ago, schoolgirl Andie Bell was murdered by Sal Singh. The police know he did it. Everyone in town knows he did it.

But having grown up in the same small town that was consumed by the murder, Pippa Fitz-Amobi isn’t so sure. When she chooses the case as the topic for her final year project, she starts to uncover secrets that someone in town desperately wants to stay hidden.

And if the real killer is still out there, how far will they go to keep Pip from the truth?

A Good Girl's Guide to Murder by Holly Jackson

Proud — Gareth Thomas

Proud by Gareth Thomas

Gareth Thomas had it all. He was a national hero, a sporting icon. He was a leader of men, captain of Wales and the British Lions. To him, rugby was an expression of cultural identity, a sacred code. It was no mere ball game. It gave him everything, except the freedom to be himself.

This is the story of a man with a secret that was slowly killing him. Something that might devastate not only his own life but the lives of his wife, family, friends and teammates. The only place where he could find any refuge from the pain and guilt of the lie he was living was on the pitch, playing the sport he loved. But all his success didn’t make the strain of hiding who he really was go away. His fear that telling the truth about his sexuality would lose him everything he loved almost sent him over the edge.

The deceit ended when Gareth became the world’s most prominent athlete to come out as a gay man. His gesture has strengthened strangers, and given him a fresh perspective. Gareth’s inspiring and moving story transcends the world of sport to tell a universal truth about feeling like an outsider, and facing up to who you really are.

Pride and Prejudice — Jane Austen

Since its immediate success in 1813, Pride and Prejudice has remained one of the most popular novels in the English language.

Jane Austen called this brilliant work “her own darling child” and its vivacious heroine, Elizabeth Bennet, “as delightful a creature as ever appeared in print.”

The romantic clash between the opinionated Elizabeth and her proud beau, Mr. Darcy, is a splendid performance of civilized sparring. And Jane Austen’s radiant wit sparkles as her characters dance a delicate quadrille of flirtation and intrigue, making this book the most superb comedy of manners of Regency England.

Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen

Radio Silence — Alice Oseman

Radio Silence by Alice Oseman

NOTE: Radio Silence, as I mentioned above, is the book that Aled Last is a main character in. So I adored that this is the Oseman book that made the list. Isaac reading about Aled is so pure.

What if everything you set yourself up to be was wrong?

Frances has been a study machine with one goal. Nothing will stand in her way; not friends, not a guilty secret – not even the person she is on the inside. Then Frances meets Aled, and for the first time she’s unafraid to be herself.

So when the fragile trust between them is broken, Frances is caught between who she was and who she longs to be. Now Frances knows that she has to confront her past. To confess why Carys disappeared…

Frances is going to need every bit of courage she has.

Gender Explorers — Juno Roche

Life-affirming interviews with young trans people who share their empowering experiences of questioning and exploring gender.

“I believe that children who are questioning and exploring their gender are the gender bosses that we all so desperately need. I believe that they are our future.”

In this life-affirming, heartening and refreshing collection of interviews, young trans people offer valuable insight and advice into what has helped them to flourish and feel happy in their experience of growing up trans.

Gender Explorers by Juno Roche

There Is No Planet B — Mike Berners-Lee

There Is No Planet B by Mike Berners-Lee

Feeding the world, climate change, biodiversity, antibiotics, plastics ― the list of concerns seems endless. But what is most pressing, what are the knock-on effects of our actions, and what should we do first? Do we all need to become vegetarian? How can we fly in a low-carbon world? Should we frack? How can we take control of technology? Does it all come down to population? And, given the global nature of the challenges we now face, what on Earth can any of us do?

Fortunately, Mike Berners-Lee has crunched the numbers and plotted a course of action that is practical and even enjoyable. There is No Planet B maps it out in an accessible and entertaining way, filled with astonishing facts and analysis. For the first time you’ll find big-picture perspective on the environmental and economic challenges of the day laid out in one place, and traced through to the underlying roots ― questions of how we live and think. This book will shock you, surprise you ― and then make you laugh. And you’ll find practical and even inspiring ideas for what you can actually do to help humanity thrive on this ― our only ― planet.

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Have you read any of the books Isaac is reads in Heartstopper?

until next time, happy reading! Meeghan xo

14 Comments

    • meeghan

      Oh yaaaaay!! I had to do a fourth rewatch with a lot of pausing and rewinding to try and figure out the books. Some of them were quite hard. There’s also a book he’s holding in one of the episodes but you don’t see the cover at all, so 🤷‍♀️ I’ve got nothing for that one!!

      • biblionerdreflections

        I’m sure the fourth rewatch was ONLY for research purposes… 😉😆 Seriously though, I’m sure that took a lot of time and expert pausing, which is why I was hoping someone else would do it. Lol. Thanks for taking the time to do it!

        • meeghan

          Hahahaha, it was definitely a hard trudge watching AGAIN 😂 But, you are most welcome!!

    • meeghan

      Same!! It’s why I had to write the post. There was a lot of pausing and rewinding to figure out the books 😂

  • Sophia (Bookwyrming Thoughts)

    I’ve yet to watch Heartstopper, but yes, we absolutely love a voracious reader and holy hell I can’t believe you put together all the books?! I’m currently making my way (more like trudging) through Avatar the Last Airbender, so that’s my excuse for not reading Heartstopper yet. But! I promise I’ll get there at some point! (Probably in 3 years…)

    • meeghan

      I LOVE ATLA!! We normally do a rewatch every two years or so, but I think we might be overdue. Zuko has the best redemption arc of any character EVER. Also, we named one of our cats after Momo — worst decision ever as she tries to steal food all the time. I’m sure we jinxed her.
      I hope you love Heartstopper when you get to it. It’s at the top of my list for best tv adaptations now. 💕

  • Tanaz Masaba

    I have yet to watch Heartstopper, but I am planning on doing it next week–currently trying to finish Wanda Vision before the premiere of Dr Stranger Multiverse Of Madness this weekend 😀 All of these book recommendations sound great, but it looks like Isaac and I have only one book in common and that’s Pride and Prejudice. I absolutely love that book and often find myself rereading it again and again.

  • Cici

    I am so glad I found this. I was willing to watch again and pause, but I was hoping someone already did the good work. I haven’t read any of these but have wanted to increase trans voices in my reading, so I’m definitely taking on GENDER EXPLORERS. Now I need someone to go through abs record all of the drinks Tori consumes (I haven’t read the book; is she well hydrated there, too?

    • meeghan

      Hahaha, Solitaire (Tori’s story) is one of my absolute favourites!! I plan on doing a reread this year so I can confirm about the hydration 😂

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